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There is no magic potion. 438 Post #2

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I am feeling so overwhelmed today! I have started a new blog  and wishing I would have stayed on track with the original; I am incorporating graduate class assignments with the creation of new materials for fall technonlogy workshops and…on top of thatl, I am having operational challenges with technology that are making my head swell into a throbbing bulbous annoyance rather than the swiftly streaming sensory player I appreciate and respect. 

Escape…I’m off  to the “Cool Cat” teacher blog for some insight and I find another conference I want to attend, but what, in June–just days away.  And then I slow down…yes slow down and reread. It’s an online conference  with our own, Dr. Cheri Toledo as a presenter and  I’m already registered. As a matter of fact, in the time I linked the conference registration to this page, I received confirmation of participation and list of archived conferences with topics near and dear to my heart, including connectivism. Already, the throbbing bulbous appurtenance atop my shoulder is beginning to feel once again like an essential part and not a hiderance.

Yet another item on the Cool Cat page that inspired me was a link to Virtual Worlds in Education wiki . I am working on a distance learning project that will serve as a resource to “digital immigrants”  as they teach digital natives about creating wiki spaces for learning. Wow!! what a template the Horizon Project Virtual Wiki offers!

I am feeling less stressed. My morning started with James Lang’s “A Brain and A Book” arguing whether we need to accomodate teaching to the needs of the digital native or whether there is value in the past and the mediums by which we (the immigrants) learned and formed communities. His notions were in response to Marc Prensky’s Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants , a text admonishing those of us from a certain generation to quit whining and “Just do it!” –take the leap of faith into the world of technology.

As I continued to read through blogs and logs, emails and assignment rubrics, I felt overwhelmed by what I don’t know and what I don’t know how to do. Technology and my own personality have a way of teaming up on me. I often blame technology for speeding me up, instilling impatience, and adding to my personal list of what I could or should do, and so now, I am ready to slow down and accept for a few hours the fact that the more I learn about technology, the more I learn I don’t know. My day to day tasks are small in the ripples of real time and not worth the pain of a throbbing headache.

The throbbing is gone; I am in a state John Keats called “Negative Capability”–“when a man is capable of being in uncertainties, mysteries, doubts, without any irritable reaching after fact and reason.” I am content, for the remainder of the day, to not strive for SBR as a foundation for motivation or reasoning. I will read and enjoy these moments and hold the notions of others loosely in my mind.

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